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Sandro Rosell
FC Barcelona President
Saturday, September 23, 2017

New York City is holding regular elections for mayor, public advocate, comptroller, and all 51 seats on the city council in 2017. Partisan primaries are scheduled for September 12, 2017, and the general election will be held on November 7, 2017. The filing deadline for candidates who wished to run in this election was July 13, 2017.

Forty-eight of the 51 city council seats are currently held by Democrats, and three are held by Republicans. Multiple candidates are on the ballot competing for 42 of the seats in either the primary or general election. The September primary features 33 contested Democratic primaries, one contested Republican primary, and one contested Green Party primary.

There are 10 open city council races without an incumbent. Seven incumbents, including Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito (D), are ineligible to run for re-election due to term limits

Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) faces a crowded primary field in his bid for a second term in 2017. De Blasio's campaign benefits from other elected Democrats declining to seek the office, a 6-to-1 registration advantage for Democrats in the city, and a sizable campaign finance advantage. Republican candidate Nicole Malliotakis has secured the support of the Conservative Party, which will enable her to appear on multiple lines on the November ballot if she wins the Republican primary.

Another three incumbents—Julissa Ferreras-Copeland (D), Ruben Wills (D), and David Greenfield (D)—are also not running for re-election. Ferreras-Copeland was considered a front-runner to become the next speaker but opted not to run for re-election to the council. Wills was expelled from office following his conviction for fraud and grand larceny in July 2017. Greenfield withdrew from the race to accept a position with the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty. Mark-Viverito's departure from the council will result in the election of a new speaker.

Below, is a list of candidates, both challengers and incumbents, who are seeking elected office in New York City.

NYC Mayor

1) Bill De Blasio (D) incumbent

2) Sal Albanese

3) Richard Bashner

4) Robert Gangi

5) Michael Tolkin

Republican Primary

Nicole Malliotakis

Public Advocate

Letitia James, Democrat, incumbent

David Eisenbach, Democrat & Liberal

J.C. Polanco, Republican

James Lane, Green

Michael O'Reilly, Conservative

Devin Balkind, Libertarian

Cardon Pompey (party TBD)

Comptroller

Scott Stringer, Democrat, incumbent

Michel J. Faulkner, Republican

Alex Merced, Libertarian

Julia Willebrand, Green

Bronx Borough President

Ruben Diaz, Jr., Democrat, incumbent

Camella Pinkney-Price, Democrat

Avery Selkridge, Democrat

Michael Garcia (party TBD)

Brooklyn Borough President

Eric Adams, Democrat, incumbent

Ben Kissel, Reform & Libertarian

Vito Bruno, Republican

Manhattan Borough President

Gale Brewer, Democrat, incumbent

Brian Waddell, Libertarian

Daniel Vila, Green

Linda Liu (party TBD)

Brooklyn District Attorney

Eric Gonzalez, Democrat, incumbent (named acting District Attorney in 2016)

Patricia Gatling, Democrat

Vincent Gentile, Democrat

Stephanie Ama-Dwimoh, Democrat

Marc Fliedner, Democrat

Anne Swern, Democrat

Manhattan District Attorney

Cy Vance, Democrat, incumbent

City Council District 44 - open seat (held by David Greenfield, who is not seeking reelection)

Kalman Yeger, Democrat

Yoni Hikind, Our Neighborhood

City Council District 47

Mark Treyger, Democrat, incumbent

Raimondo Denaro, Republican

City Council District 48

Chaim M. Deutsch, Democrat, incumbent

Marat Filler, Democrat

Steven Saperstein, Republican