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Testimonials

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Sandro Rosell
FC Barcelona President
Friday, July 21, 2017

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, seen here endorsing Councilman Dan Halloran in his run for Congress. A state senator is urging former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani to consider another run for City Hall. Ruben Dίaz (D-Bronx) says that if Giuliani does decide to run in 2013, he can expect to receive more than 40 percent of the city’s Hispanic vote as a thank you gesture for appointing so many high-ranking Hispanics during his tenure as mayor.

Dίaz also noted that Giuliani showed tremendous leadership in the wake of the September 11 attacks and in ejecting former PLO Leader Yasser Arafat from a concert at Lincoln Center. While Dίaz concedes that Giuliani had a “heavy-handed way of approaching things,” he praises him for cleaning up the city, getting rid of so-called “squeegee men,” and reducing overall crime. “I believe that the heart of New York is with America’s Mayor,” said Dίaz. “And I believe that in these precarious times, New York City needs Rudy Giuliani.”

Giuliani was first elected mayor in 1993, beating incumbent David Dinkins, who had won the mayor’s race four years earlier in a close contest against Giuliani. Under Dinkins, the city’s first black mayor, crime rose to record levels and there was a general feeling that he lacked the leadership abilities necessary to govern. Giuliani’s critics labeled him a bully, but his tough stance on minor offenses such as graffiti, turnstile jumping, marijuana possession, and aggressive panhandling by “squeegee men”helped lower crime dramatically.Giuliani easily cruised to a second term when Manhattan Borough President Ruth Messinger ran against him. He planned a run for the Senate in 2000 but dropped out when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, which he successfully fought.

He was dubbed “America’s Mayor” for his steadfast handling of the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of 9/11. He ran for the GOP presidential nomination in 2008 but, despite early polls showing him the frontrunner, he ran a haphazard campaign and consistently came in last or next to last in most every primary, something that likely stemmed from his moderate positions on gay rights, abortion, and gun control.

Giuliani, a staunch supporter of Israel, has had several openings to run for office in New York State, including running for governor in 2010 and for Kirsten Gillibrand’s Senate seat this year, but he declined both. He is enjoying a very profitable life in the private sector as founder of his security consulting firm Giuliani Partners. He is also a partner in the law firm Bracewell & Giuliani. Though he is supporting Mitt Romney for president, during the Republican primaries Giuliani seemed to be leaning towards New Gingrich and had been critical of Romney on several occasions. Should Romney become president, however, there is speculation Giuliani might be appointed to a cabinet position, such as attorney general or secretary of defense.

For his part, Giuliani has not made any suggestion that he desires his old job back, despite there being a conspicuous lack of any Republican contenders for mayor.

The current mayoral field of Democrats includes City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Public Advocate Bill deBlasio, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, and former New York City Comptroller and Democratic Party candidate for Mayor in 2009 Bill Thompson.