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Sandro Rosell
FC Barcelona President
Sunday, February 19, 2017

Jewish Thought

The world is one long chain of events, dating all the way back to Adam.

God created this world as a place of maximum challenge, and therefore, man must be inherently imperfect and die. The sin of Adam revealed this imperfection because of which man must make the transition of death. Accordingly, God told Adam, "But from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, do not eat, for on the day you eat from it, you will definitely die" (Genesis 2:17). Since we are all descendants of Adam, all must share this fate.

Therefore, death is the destiny of every person, and none can escape it. We are thus taught, "[Just as] no person can control the wind or stop it from blowing, neither is there any control over the day of death" (Ecclesiastes 8:8). No

(Excerpted from the book

 “They Must Go” – 1980)

The analysis and proposed transfer of Arabs from Israel that I have set down are not personal views. They are certainly not political ones. This is the Jewish outlook, based on halakah the law as postulated in the Torah.

The removal of all Arabs who refuse to accept the exclusive, unquestioned Jewish sovereignty over Eretz Yisrael is not only logical and normal for any Jew with a modicum of an instinct for self-preservation; it is also the

“Because I am proud of being Jewish, I am worried by the growing anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in the world.”

The newly released biography, Steven Spielberg: A Life in Films by Molly Haskell, delves into the Jewish life of the iconic director and the impact of his childhood on his countless award-winning films.

Years ago, right before the release of Schindler’s List, Spielberg spoke openly about his Jewish roots and about his hopes for his own children. As a child, the Spielbergs moved

Like the trees in the depth of winter, we have the power to emerge from darkness and blossom.

The earliest blooming trees in Israel are awakening from a long, deep, winter’s nap. The trees have spent many months in hibernation. Until now, our beloved nurturing sources of shade and breath have been absorbing water from deep beneath the ground. This God-given survival mechanism has sustained them up until now. But now begins a new cycle in their lives. In this moment, they will draw sustenance

The “new year for trees” has a special set of meaningful customs.

Tu B’Shvat appears in the Talmud (Rosh Hashanah 2a) as one of the four “new years” in the Jewish calendar:

“Beit Hillel says that the ‘new year for the trees’ is the 15th of Shevat – Tu B’Shvat.”

The custom on Tu B’Shvat is to eat fruits from the seven species for which the Land of Israel is praised: "...a land of wheat, barley, [grape] vines, fig trees and pomegranates, a land of olive trees and [date] honey" (Deut